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all over again: san francisco's technology needs a culture shock." >> thank you very much. president chiu. >> thank you mr. chair. i wanted to make a couple of introductory comments and thank you for taking part in this hearing and in particular i want to thank the civil grand jury report for looking at this topic. i decided to bring with me today these folders. these folders represent all of the documents i have been looking at in the last couple of years on this specific topic and in particular let me just title a couple of the reports i have on this. from 2002 from the former executive director from dits, which is the predecessor agency to the department of technology and proposal for management and resources. then go a couple years later the civil grand jury report looked at our technology with hospital "pot holes or possibilities" and a year later the city controller had a letter and said they needed to improve service and performance measures. after that our city analyst did a management audit into their practices and two years later a another analyst looking into the ci
have been to the doctor and all of those things. this is the way that technology can help people) distant connect with us. 75% of our users say that we work with others to provide care and support. today, ties is three years old, and we have learned a lot about lessons with the good life. our number-one lesson is that no one should have to face thelma's, disability, or caregiving on their own. there are growing numbers -- why we did pay attention to this, constantly reaching out in creating our own networks, keeping them informed is one major reason, there are more and more of us living alone. 40% of people over 60 live alone. we are more vulnerable in terms of how we are living and we are more vulnerable because those of us are living with chronic and complex diseases. that can lead and capacity to it is a very positive thing to do. what we might think of as our desire is for the company and so on, our health is a social affair. our health is intimately tied with our connections and support. when we have a good network around us, we heal more quickly, we live longer. and when we
for technology needs to be improved. technology is a highly dynamic and ever changing field. no one can predict the five years of technology or what talent will be required. of your cell phone. the administrator requires a staffing plan. doesn't exist. there maybe hurdles to overcome but hiring as permanent exempt is better than the traditional civil service for technology. it reduces time to hire. it raises proakt of attracting top talent. it means hiring mistakes can be corrected easily. it's done elsewhere in the city. lawyers and our attorney departments do have at will status for the same reasons as we find with technology. isn't it worth the effort to match talent with what is needed? culture is a mighty force. it provides comfort in it's traditions. it's a safe haven u because it's tried and accepted. it's reinforced because it's troublesome to change but culture all blinds to the other ways of doing things evening if the other ways hint of doing better. it stifles and shuts down i thinking. it doesn't anticipate the unintended consequences of changing times. this grand jur
of technology and cio and coit we spend time creating these partnerships and the consolidation project is a great one. i also want to acknowledge the airport and the emergency management center and we have a great partnership with. we have a great partnership with labor and reclassify it positions and training program whereas in the past it was done on a department by department basis so i think we're creating those partnerships for success, but i think at the end of the day it's a transitional challenge for the organization to go from thinking of itself as minicorporations as they view themselves at times in independent departments to work together as a cohesive unit. it just grew up. we started in the main frame days and monolithic and those terminals and pc revolution game and it was different overnight and everyone had a pc and the expert on how to work things so we are looking for a balance. we are bringing your own device to work and still balance that and what does it make sense to have centralized and do from a security confidential standpoint and it's exciting time. i wel
management audit evaluating department of technology's function and dt adequately communicates with other departments and alleviate their barriers to performance and i gather from other agencies this will be implemented and while the audit will be helpful it is my understanding this is under way. recommendation number four -- >> excuse me. through the chair, president chiu, i think in terms what is required for responses to the recommendations there are four categories of responses. either has been implemented, has not been implemented but will be implemented. for that we need a time frame for the implementation of the recommendation requires further analysis, that requires description of the scope and time frame not exceeding six months and lastly -- [inaudible] >> my understanding is this will be implemented but the six month time frame is appropriate if that is something we're required to do. >> okay. so for will be implemented -- yes. as long as there is a time frame. >> okay. i will use that as a default, for time period for coit and department of technology to work with this
with your friends as well. we are all lucky to live in san francisco, because so many of our technology companies have located their headquarters here in san francisco. [cheers and applause] and because they're located here, we can always ask them for a favor here and there and make sure no one is left out, because that is what we do in government. david chiu and i come from backgrounds where we do not want to leave anybody behind. we want everybody to enjoy the riches of technology. we want them to enjoy the economy in san francisco. that is why we're working so hard to make sure our central marketplace is welcoming of all these technology companies, making sure that we can work with other cities. i am very lucky to be part of the u.s. conference of mayors, and they allow me to represent san francisco as the innovative center for all the rest of the cities across the country. so we get to compare information and there. what these days i will get to talk to you while i am in washington, d.c., and you can hear what i am saying across there, so we can enjoy it -- wherever i go, you know i
technologies foundation is proud to support to the contrary on pbs our foundation seeks to advance science education and further society's understanding of the life sciences including the impact of gee ownmics on the practice of medicine. >> and by sam's club. committed to small business and the spirit of the entrepreneur. and proud to support pbs's to the contrary with bonnie erbe. additional funding provided by... this week on a special edition of to the contrary, we take an indepth look at dna sequencing and how it's helping children with rare dna sequencing and how it's helping children with rare diseases. [♪] >> hello i'm bonnie erbe welcome to to the contrary a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. this week we show you how advances in dna sequencing are helping scientists find cures for rare diseases especially rare childhood diseases. dr. james lupski is a man with a mission as a pediatrician at baylor college of medicine in houston, dr. lupski has devoted much of his medical career to researching and treating children with rare diseases. >> the patients
that we are providing incentives, economic incentives for new industries, clean technology, could almost get the justification for funding -- for funding that through hamilton's argue. hamilton makes the argument that we need infrastructure and roads to support manufacturers. he makes the argument that we need the right tax incentives, and that we need a right of work force that is educated. jefferson has the view that the government needs to support manufacturing. now, this becomes the american economic system and influences henry, abraham lincoln, and is the governing philosophy of america's rise in industrialization. herbert hoover, when i got to the commerce building, and why would your name be in the commerce building, the president responsible for the depression, there's a lot of republic for hoover. he was not the best president, but a great commerce secretary. he was the secretary of commerce and under secretary of everything else, and he was working for calvin coolidge, and you know what hoover did? he believed in the american economic system, and he and calvin coolage, the apos
keep being leaders in technology and celebrating our status, but also implementing the programs to help us continue that very nice title we have, the innovation capital of the world. and i am here today in collaboration with board president david chiu and so many others from our committee on information technology, spur, our different various city departments, really trying to improve on what we've done already. back in 2009 then mayor gavin newsome to the light of all of us had introduced that we ought to really establish some guidelines to open up our city's data. and in the year later, the board, less legislation, the first open data legislation in san francisco that made us cutting edge throughout the country, the first to come out and say to everybody in the public, to people who wanted to create businesses, wanted to look at the city with kind of an open invitation to involve themselves with what the city had. and part of that really neat understanding was that we were holding onto so much of our own data in our own silos with our own very focused obligations that we had, and not
>> good morning, everybody. welcome to the technology summit. we are looking forward to a fantastic day. we are going to start with a demonstration of the wii system. it is an interactive gaming system that allows people to play different activities and participate in different fitness activities together. a lot of wii systems, about 40, are being deployed around the city to different senior centers and residents facilities to encourage older adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. w
to the core of may. and that is why i have learned the necessary needs of technology whto learn and to grw at to do things. and why you and i need the things you're going to hear in just a couple of minutes. i just want to take a quick moment as you get settled. you will have to stop talking because i will not talk over you. you, too. i'm going to count to ten. i usually don't have to finish to ten. when you think of technology in the world today, we can't even imagine what is going to have the month from now. think of the things that have been eaten up. we used to have payphones. they are gone. the cellphone 8 it up. the cellphone 8 of the camera industry. you don't need to buy a camera. the cellphone 8 the watch industry. i don't even wear a watch. you can go through the list. he you don't have to go to the bank anymore. take a picture of a check and make a deposit. look at all the things that we have changed. and change every day. if we can't imagine what is going to happen by christmas time. you don't even have to go to the pharmacy to say, fill this out. pick up a phone, punch in, go
gave a tech talk, technology entertainment design, many are boring but his talk has been viewed 100,000 times. here is part of it. >> i was only four years old when i saw my motherlode the washing machine for the very first time in her life. even grandma was invited to see the machine. throughout her life, she had been heating water with fire hood and hand wash laundry for her seven children and sat down in front of the machine and she watched the entire washing program. to my grandmother, the washing machine was a miracle. >> but there are seven billion people on work and most have no access to such miracles. >> two billion have access and the remaining five billion, how do they wash? they wash like this: by hand. it is a time consuming labor which they have to do for hours every week. they want the washing machine. they don't want to spend such a large part of their life doing this hard work with so relatively low productivity. but when i electric truer to environmentally concerned students they say everyone in the can world cannot have cars and washing machine. how can we tell th
installed. 30 minutes, solar basics, stay with me. >> let's talk about the technology, what is it and how does it work? there are three types of solar actually when you sauk about solar. i want to avoid the confusion to make sure we're focusing on the right one. two of them involve heating water and they're very viable technologies, can be very coast effective but we're not going to deal with them right now. one is solar pool heating. it pumps the water up there, heats it, runs it through there, the sun heats it and back into the pool. this one is called solar thermal or solar hot water. it heats domestic hot water or d.h.w. that's your hot water that you use four showers and dishwashers. we're going to talk about solar electric. they have the same technology as computer chips. they're similar in structure to that tran cystor-like computer chip technology based on silicon. the best thing about them is there are no moving parts and they last a long time. there are cells, modules, and arrays. a cell is one of these pieces here. it's a small unit wired together in a certain way to produce ha
but this gentleman has caught the world's attention because he gave a tech talk, technology entertainment design, many are boring but his talk has been viewed 100,000 times. here is part of it. >> i was only four years old when i saw my motherlode the washing machine r the very first time in her life. even grandma was invited to see the machine. throughout her life, she had been heating water with fire hood and hand wash laundry for her seven children and sat down in front of the machine and she watched the entire washing program. to my grandmother, the washing machine was a miracle. >> but there are seven billion people on work and most have no access to such miracles. >> two billion have access and the remaining five billion, how do they wash? they wash like this: by hand. it is a time consuming labor which they have to do for hours every week. they want the washing machine. they don't want to spend such a large part of their life doing this hard work wit so relatively low productivity. but when i electric truer to environmentally concerned students they say everyone in the can world cannot ha
on theyu would put you to sleep but he has caught the roads attention because he gave a talk to technology entertainment decide more than 100,000 times here is part of it. >> when i saw my mother and though the washing machine for the first time in her life. >> even grandma was invited to see the machine. she had hand washed laundry for seven children and she sat down in front of the ch she watched the entire program and was mesmerized to my grandmother>> b the washing machine was a are >> there 7 billion people and most have no access to the miracle. hav >> 2 billion have access but the remainnng 5 billion how do they wash? like this. by hand. it is a hard time consuming labor that they have to do for hours every week. they want the washing machine that what the large part of their life doing this hard part with low productivity. but environmentally concerned students say that everybody can have them. how to retell this woman she cannot? >> students don't want them to? >> they are concerned aboutngou how many of you had to wash your genes? no one. s one time there was one boy. but there w
, united states is pushing forward with technology and the market economy and they ve a lot of good public health things beg done and the rest of the world that is dominateing, india and china, but in the 60's they ssed the market economies are good and they grow their economies and they are catching up. todaen we land, 2010, tse are the countries that borro money theichest when they have their problems. >> in my mind this raises two questions, or two amazing results from this. there have been thousands of years of human history and everyone was stuck on the lower left for thousands of years, it has been 200 years that you have all of this activity and how comeome countries are still stuck? >> it is easy to understand. the best message today is that most of thefrican countries are now in fast economic growth. they have correctedthe wrong market ideas they had 20 years ago, and they have a much better education than, -- and tanzania is similar to thailand in 1972 and soon we will see african countries doing good. >> this is wonderful. our problems are solved w know wh works and we will be
clinton on technology and society, produced several films and named by "newsweek," as, quote, one of the women shaping the 21st century. she is a parent and is focused on making an impact, especially in our everyday use of technology and connection and her newest film is called "engage." take a look. [ speaking spanish ] >> that is your life clock. some day it's going to stop. a lot of things are going happen in the world between now and then, so what are you going to do while you're here? stand on the sidelines? or are you going to be part of something bigger? give a little bit, give a little bit of my life for you give a little bit, give a little bit of your life to me. >> tiffany, welcome back. you always are so fascinating to me. you're constantly re-inventing yourself. do you ever run out of new ideas? >> right now, i'm in a fertile period. and i'm always interested in the same thing and that is basically the internet. >> uh-huh. >> and how do we be mindful of how we're living in the world? in essence, i'm exploring the same idea for 20 years. >> and it's funny. you started t
: and for the first time during new year's, officers are using enhanced shot spotter technology, a system that records the sound and location of gunfire and sends the information directly to an officer's patrol car laptop. >> we are going to be out there. we are going to be watching you. we're taking it very seriously. >> people are going to do what they want to do regardless. so i just hope that people don't get hurt. i hope people are safe tonight. >> reporter: some residence say no matter how many officers are out chasing down gunfire tonight, the roof problem remains unsolved. >> and there are too many guns out and irresponsible people as well. >> reporter: police are stepping up the dui patrols, encouraging anyone that sees or hears gunfire to text 888777 tip to oakland pd. in oakland, cbs 5. >>> it's a very happy new year in washington. the senate is closing out 2012 with a fiscal cliff deal with just hours to spare. negotiators found common grounds on tax hikes and spending cuts. the senate is expected to vote some time tomorrow. and cb s 5 reporter sharon chin has the details for you. >> repor
defensively allocated. liz: how do you feel about technology? some of these names are now able to pay dividends, so much cash on their balance sheets and they're ready because they have a little bit of clarity. >> technology is different now than it was 10 years ago. it is not necessarily the hot growth spots, it is like industrials used to be, dividends, stable growth. ultimately you can have a better opportunity from technology in the second half rather than in the first half but in terms of 2013 overall, technology is the place we would look to add exposure over the course of the year. liz: let's talk globally. emerging markets or different points on the planet where would you be putting your money? >> emerging markets are a great spot because we have seen a return to diversification in our view. we have gotten to the point we are not entirely risk on, risk off. no different assets of risk, emerging markets are one of those areas particularly in asia right now. right now we like china, hong kong, malaysia is also an opportunity that we see as being attractive. liz: how would you pl
of technology will play in the 5100 in 150 years. first news update from c-span radio. >> there's no word yet on when president obama will sign the bill that avoids the fiscal cliff after congress passed the bill last night, the president left for hawaii. the president can sign the bill remotely using a machine called an auto pen or the bill will be flown to hawaii for his signature. paychecks won't be increasing now now that congress averted the fiscal cliff. the bill passed by congress does not include extending a social security payroll tax cut at the end of last year so workers will now be pay being 2% more in social security taxes. wall street futures risen sharply today. dow jones industrial futures are up 200 points. asian marks finished higher today as well as european markets their up as well. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> you don't always find many in the area embracing investigative reporting. the point we've seen over the years it's not just economics, it's the discomfort that investigative reporting often causes in the newsroom. because it's troubles
to you empty spaces but beware. that technology isn't perfect. cornell is live in san francisco. >> there are 29,000 parking spaces in san francisco. 7000 of them are smart like these equipment technology to help smart phone app signal where empty parking spaces are but doesn't always work finding parking in san francisco. can be a mission impossible. >> drive around for like half hour sometimes. easily. >>reporter: san francisco is one city in the bay area using smart parking technology which adiscuss praises and meters and senses determine if a space is vacant. parking app use the information to help you find the nearest space. officials admit only 90 percent accurate. >> anything as far as using new technology can't be absolutely perfect but what we have done is to look at this ongoing basis and make tweak when we can. >>reporter: we down loaded the free park app including empty spaces on haight street near franklin. 6 minutes later we were there but only found a very crowded street. this time it appears the app let us down. not a single space here on haight street a
shot spotter technology, a system that records the sound and location of gunfire and sends the information directly to an officer's patrol car laptop. >> we are going to be out there. we are going to be watching you. >> people are going to do what they're going to do, regardless, so i just hope that people don't get hurt. i just hope people are safe tonight. >> reporter: some oakland residents say no matter how many officers are out chasing gunfire tonight... >> there are irresponsible people. >> reporter: oakland police are also stepping is up dui patrols. in oakland, christin ayers, cbs 5 eyewitness news. >>> we're following breaking news out of san francisco's fisherman's wharf right now. san francisco police say a person was shot in the hand at 211 jefferson at mesa. police are reportedly looking for the suspected gunman in the area. we'll bring you more information as it comes into our newsroom. once again, a person, according to sfpd, was shot in the hand on fisherman's wharf. >>> high society meets high explosives. a new york city couple is under arrest after police
in the economic zone. the japan agency for marine, earth, and science technology will send a ship to an island about 2,000 kilometers southeast of tokyo. the ocean there is more than 5,000 meters deep. the researchers plan to extract samples of mud by sinking a pipe 20 meters into the seabed. then they'll analyze the types, densities, and locations of rare earth metals. a group from the university of tokyo found high concentrations of the metals in the area last june. they estimated the deposits could satisfy japan's needs for those materials for more than 200 years. analysts at the u.s. geological survey says china accounts for 97% of global output of the metals. >>> fresh or frozen? many gourmets say that's what separates a fine dining experience from a soggy tv meal. now a small japanese company is ready to send the question itself the way of the ice age. >> reporter: this high-end sushi restaurant in tokyo serves extremely good tuna. it's frozen, but you'd never guess. these are the advanced freezers which preserve the fish's freshness. the secret is magnetic waves. food is kept constantly
the container royalty fund. it was established in the 1960s to help dockworkers displaced by technology, the port alliance says these days those royalties serve as a bonus to workers, not a safety net. but the union disagrees saying the payments still help compensate workers for lost job opportunities. florida is home to almost a third of the ports that would be affected by the potential strike, governor rick scott says he's still thinks a deal will be reached, but if it doesn't he's counting on washington to step in. allison worrell, "n.b.r.," fort lauderdale, florida. >> susie: volatility was the word of the day here on wall street. investors were fixated on the war of words in washington over the fiscal cliff, and shrugged off some encouraging news today about jobs. fewer americans filed for jobless benefits last week: new claims fell 12,000 to 350,000. but the labor department says the christmas holiday may have distorted the numbers, as some state offices were closed monday and tuesday and could not provide data. in the markets, the volatility index, or what's often called the "fea
to innovation. >>> 13 years ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets p
brennan and jon lapook. mark strassman on a new technology that could stop deadly drunk driving accidents. >> the optical signature registers above .08, then the vehicle will prevent you from moving. >> and with elephants under siege by poachers, m. sanjay meets a woman who has become a foster mother raising baby elephants until they can care for themselves. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> good evening. scott is off. i'm rebecca jarvis. in a few hours, the u.s. will go over the fiscal cliff which could trigger across-the-board tax increases and billions in spending cuts. however, there is hope for a soft landing. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell and president obama said today a deal was close. but late in the day house leaders announced they will not vote on a deal tonight. they're waiting for the senate. so what happens now? we have two reports beginning with nancy cordes on capitol hill. nancy, good evening. >> good evening to you, rebecca. it looks like the deadline pressure finally prompted a meeting of the minds today. negotiat
working group. okay. >> thanks. >> thank you, penny. >> item 8d, update on other technology projects. >> director tom hue, since pam is not here because she is home today, same report last month, i don't think there's that many update on the item. >> item 8e, update on q-matic. >> this is regarding q-matic. i regret to inform you, i want to put a closure on this particular q-matic. however, we tried a few months ago and it doesn't work out and then my decision before is to put a temporary on hold. now after the discussion with the staff and also former committee to investigate on this particular process, that's summarized in my letter to all the commissioner here. i would like to put a closure on here and put permanent slip on this system. >> great, i know commissioner mccray requested to have closure on it. so this letter officially does that to us. okay. >> do we have to make any motions, take any actions on it? just executive decision? all right, good. >> thank you. >> thank you for pointing that out and writing the letter for closure, dr. mccray. >> is there any further comm
. a big logo slide. >> and we're supposed to be about the technology. >> imagine a big stop bullying speak up logo on the slide behind me. >> say that again. >> stop bullying, speak up is the name of the campaign and a nice transition. my complements to everyone in the room. if i have learned everything in the last four years while researching bullying prevention and for our age group and the kids in the second through seventh grade it's that not only does it take a village but a village of people who are willing to partner and collaborate with each other and speak not only to adults about this issue but speak to children and i think it's an interesting transition from mia's work to mine. still not mine. >> it is but -- >> and the role we play at cartoon network and thousands of kids at home everyday and the role we play is taking that information, translating it and content on the line and when kids come independently to our screens to play games and watch television and do a variety of things we have information for them on information they care deeply part. in 2008 as research we do
to grandparents using social media, we'll look at how dod and the cia are exploiting this new technology as a powerful intelligence tool. then with washington mired in political gridlock we take a closer look at the last great senate. but first, the nonpartisan stimson center recently released a report, a new u.s. defense strategy for a new era that outlines four approaches for cutting defense spending but maintaining capability. stimson's co-founder barry blechman spearheaded the study. the report has become a must- read for anyone involved in the coming defense review or budget planning team. barry, welcome to the team. >> thank you, vag go. >> congratulations for your slot on the defense news top 100 most influential people. >> that was the biggest thrill of the year. >> so let's start off with the report. each report begins with assumptions about threats to the united states to be facing and what's going to be needed to meet them what. are those threats and what's the right strategy to address those threats as cost efficiently as possible? >> the group was more optimistic than many p
disappointing data. well, technology shares under pressure, especially the large cap names. the selling could be due to uncertainty on a budget deal and folks just wanting to lock in gains, potentially, of course, before taxes on capital gains go up next year. maybe not such a surprise. check out the spider select technology fund, an etf, exposure to the likes of, yes, app 8, and soft -- apple, and software makers and stocks. xlk, the name, and it's dropping. apple, of course, look at what apple's doing, down today, about 1%, but it is up 27% this year. google moving higher. microsoft and ebay lower today, especially ebay down, well, nearly a buck today on the trade. all right, so about, oh, about 47 minutes left of trading on the day after christmas. the markets still trying to get back to the water mark. they are now down about six points after briefly getting above in positive territory. tech stocks the worst. case index showing home prices on the rise, a good thing. check in on how this moves the markets, if at all, nicole's on the new york stock exchange, and jeff flock at the cme. nicol
's legacy. how are you, sir? >> good morning. >> i'm interested in how technology can revive the dream. let's talk about post partisan ways to use technology to change a lot of the problems we have. >> let's talk about that. everybody agrees that only growth can give us the american dream again and balance the budget. >> how? >> the key to any successful economy in the world today is to have widespread broadband, lots of that internet you were just talking about and very, very cheep and clean energy. if we can move the economy very, very rapidly to cheep and clean energy and to very widespread broadband, we will have the platform on which rapid economic growth will be possible. >> you made the me think about a guest we had a couple of weeks ago. ray was brilliant and talked a lot about the singularity and the future where man and machine and technology will be much more merged than we are now. technology will allow it to do things that are unimaginable at this point. do you foresee that future where technology becomes part of the body and allows it to go to another level. >> the most exciti
-grade of equipment, standard soldier was going to walk out $25,000 worth of equipment. technology is really something trikes me perhaps a little bit, i wonder what your thoughts are on at commack as this glidepath has gone along, your argument that the generals have become less inspirational and less strategic thinking and so forth, the technology glidepath has been going in the opposite direction so by requirement they have to send more and more time trying to understand the technology, what it is, how to use it and their focus may be has gone there and they have done well with it. i remember battalion commander in desert storm had this box stuck in my vehicle attached to a cellphone but i was horrified. and i expected to get a lot of supervision. really didn't happen but my sense is it has slowly been happening in the age of e-mail. you think technological revolution has had some impact in how officers have to think, how they are trained, how they command and in direct and in some way contributed to the situation you described. >> we always look at technological solutions even when the answers are
to the experience of a woman like maria montessori. the third principle is innovation and technology. when i say italy everybody will think of the arts and music. they don't think of technology yet we want to persuade you there are lots of things to be discovered. i was working in the world of energy and there i think we have taken enormous steps in the direction of a modern sustainable green economy, what we call now distributed generations of people producing and consuming energy. this is happening at an incredible pace in california and i know california like this is and we want to connect with california. some of the events will require the supports of the leaders that are here present, the leaders of the italian american associations. i am very proud to say that all of the leaders of the italian american associations are gathered today, mr. mayor, and senator assembly man and board of supervisors is here to celebrate with us and ramona blackwell who with the committee of the italians abroad and elected body and we will need your support and it's not just top down but bottom up. we're
and technology? >> it's a good question, and it's one that comes up all the time. and i think the important thing to recognize is, you know, people -- when the airplane came along, okay, the framers had no idea there would be air travel like that. probably except for jefferson. [laughter] but he wasn't around when they were writing the constitution. so does that mean that the commerce clause doesn't apply to air travel? of course not. the principles that the framers meant to establish in the commerce clause certainly can readily be applied to evolving commerce. the court doesn't always get this right. i mean, for example, when wiretaps first came up, you know, when the framers wrote the fourth amendment about searches and seizures, they didn't envisions wiretaps, and the first decision was, well, the fourth amendment momentum apply o this. but it became pretty clear pretty quickly that allowing people to intercept private conversations constituted the same sort of search and seizure of material that the framers want to protect. so you try to find, at least i do -- different judges approach these
read or ever went. today this optical character recognition software, this whole technology that was developed initially and refined so that a blind person could read a book is being used in all kinds of settings. we have heard a little bit about the happy trust and that sort of thing. all kinds of waste is being used today. i happen to be excited. but my refresh will braille display with little pens the pop-up in downtown little actuators, it's expensive technology. multiply that by 32. a little bit expensive, and too expensive for a lot of people. so we have developed synthetic speech. it was pretty primitive at first and not particularly easy to understand. it sounded like this. >> chapter one, almost midnight in virginia when the phone rang in the home and two men came out the front door hastily crossing the, very this warm up the driveway onto the deserted road. >> now, if you think that is a pleasant way to read a book -- [laughter] they have been proved it with time. it can now sound like this. >> chapter one, it was almost midnight in virginia late for the farm lands
of people's eyes, which was about technology, quite critical comments about technology, which seemed quite a bit odd, given that he has only just started using twitter. >> he is not opposed to technology, as such. he is actually quite charming in his use of it -- for example, twitter. i think he is drawing attention to something that concerns a lot of people, not just catholics or christians, and that is that in the revolution, the information revolution that we are living through, the past 30 years or so, we are all of us experiencing the increasing pace of that revolution that is putting people in distress. we experience it has individuals with the phenomenon is burned -- phenomenon of burnout, which is virtually epidemic in the western world. of course, for society, it has a very serious repercussion, mainly that a society where everybody feels overloaded and cannot cope with how much they are being asked to do, it becomes a very uncaring society, a very egotistical society, and ultimately carries the seeds of its own destruction within itself. that was his message. >> what struck you a
the highest sales tax come tomorrow. >>> cars that scan your fingerprints. the new technology that could put a stop to drunk driving. >> what would you do if you found $800 lying on the street. the 911 call that surprised even the copings. -- that surprised even the cops. ,,,, sleep train thanks all those who helped make a difference last year for thousands of california foster kids. thank you for helping foster kids. thank you for the school supplies. thank you for the new shoes. thank you, secret santa. and thank you for donating money. your generosity proves that while not everyone can be a foster parent, anyone can help a foster child. - thank you. - thank you. gracias por su ayuda. it sparks a movement. look! no ugly spots! and see that shine! you've got to try finish. because once they try finish, they can't keep it to themselves. i'm switching for good. wow! awesome! finish is seriously good. cannot believe how great it works. incredible shine. i won't use anything else. love, love, love finish! so far over a million neighbors, friends, and family have switched to finish. join the fin
new technology fosh trailing and surveying. but the country is taking steps to bring its goals into reach. earlier this month, manila hosted an international meeting for countries that use geothermal power. >> it's an exchange of experiences, knowledge and realistic knowledge transfer. >> reporter: the organizers also hosted the tour of geothermal power stations in the philippines. the delegation from kenya visited this facility. the visitors found that japanese technology is widely used in the philippines, a japanese firm constructed this plant. 33 years later it is still operating at full capacity. >> we are very impressed because of the standard the availability rate is over 95%, which means that it is available most of the time. we feel that this is an example we ought to emulate. >> a japanese government official also joined the tour. like the philippines, japan has a high level of volcanic activity. it is the third largest geothermal energy reserves in the world. but geothermal makes up less than 0.3% of its energy mix. the accident at the fukushima nuclear plant in 2011
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